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6.2.9.2. Visibility and Coloring

Visibility of materials, body attributes, face attributes, edge attributes, and conducting nets can be toggled via the light bulb icons beneath the annotation's node in the Browser. This can be helpful for removal of visual clutter, for example to allow you to see features inside the mesh. For further discussion, and a worked-out example, see here.

Mesh annotations in Analyst always render the triangles that lie on the surface of the mesh. In three-dimensional structures these triangles are the surface faces of the underlying tetrahedra that constitute the mesh. In two-dimensional structures the triangles themselves constitute the mesh.

You can control the visibility of these surface triangles by toggling the visibility of the boundary conditions applied on the faces (the "face attributes") or edges (the "edge attributes") they represent. You can also control the visibility of the surface triangles by toggling the visibility of the materials from which they are constructed, or the body which they represent. A triangle will be visible unless the face attribute, edge attribute, material, body attribute, or conducting net associated with it is toggled off, in which case it will be invisible.

Coloring of materials, body attributes, face attributes, edge attributes, and conducting nets can be changed, by changing the color properties of the attribute. The color properties of the attribute can be accessed by double-clicking the attribute's node in the Browser and changing the Color parameter in the properties dialog that is presented. This can be helpful for highlighting features for presentations. For further discussion, and a worked-out example, see here.

Conducting Nets

"Conducting Nets" apply a common color to electrically connected regions of your mesh annotation. As such, they allow you to visualize electrical continuity. By coloring your annotation by Conducting Net you can easily debug discontinuities in your structure by observing color differences between regions that should be connected: a color difference indicates a discontinuity. For further discussion, and a worked-out example, see here.

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